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Jadetiger Tea™

 
 
 
 
 
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ABOUT

 
  T ea EO    Lan Pham Zentil

TeaEO

Lan Pham Zentil

Based in Laguna Beach, California, Jadetiger Tea sources single origin leaves from tea estates around the globe + offers proprietary herbal blends to please all tea lovers alike.

Jadetiger Tea is a creative outlet for founder Lan Zentil, who after a bone cancer diagnosis in 2011, decided to take a step back from the business world, and a pivotal step towards sharing love + warmth with others, one cup at a time.

Our tea is made from the heart, with the highest quality leaves, with NO flavorings or artificial additives. Herbal blends are composed from whole fruits, flowers, spices, herbs + roots.

Tea wares, tea accessories + tea snacks are thoughtfully curated for ease of tea enjoyment.  We hope you take pleasure in our teas as much as we savor testing + tasting on the R + D end.

Thank you for being in our intrawebisphere.

 
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Join Jadetiger's CommuniTEA

Let's talk tea collabs, share blog posts + upcoming teavents,

without overwhelming your inbox [pinky promise]

 
 

tea@jadetigertea.com

(844) TEA - LIFE    |    (844) 832 - 5433

{by The Corporation for Public Thoughtfulness}

TEA 101

Whether you are new to tea, a casual drinker or connoisseur, there is a tea for everyone.  Tea 101 serves as a guideline for all tea drinkers.  There is no right or wrong way to Tea, the best way… is your way.

WHAT IS TEA

All Tea comes from one leaf called Camellia Sinensis, a warm-climate evergreen shrub.  The differences in flavor profiles lie in Terroir, environmental conditions specific to a country, climate, elevation + growing region.

TYPES OF TEA

W H I T E

The most delicate + least processed of all teas.  Appreciated for natural sweetness, subtlety, + complexity.  Brewed at a lower temperature + shorter time.

G R E E N

Tealeaves are plucked + immediately steam processed to retain the freshness + green leaf color.  Leaves can be rolled, hand-processed, cut or curled all resulting in a variety of flavor profiles.

O O L O N G

Between green + black teas, “Wulong” teas range from 30 – 70% oxidation.  The tea takes on a dragon shape, a furled ball with a tail, hence the name.  The methods of processing are time-consuming + vary vastly from country to growing region to tea estate.  Distinct for fragrance + earthy tones.

B L A C K

The most robust of all teas, black teas are fully oxidized + heated to remove all moisture from the tea leaf, leaving the quintessential aroma of a red to dark brown liquor, hence the commonly used term “red tea” in many Asian cultures.

P U ' E R H

Dating back from the days of the Silk Road when teas were baked into bricks or “coins” for easier transport.  The long journey from China to the Middle East + Europe created a natural aging + fermentation process that surprisingly added deeper richness + nuanced sophistication beyond compare.  In China, the Pu’erh fermentation process is still highly guarded + passed on from generation to generation of tea masters.

P U R P L E

A new cultivar of Camellia Sinensis developed with high levels of anthocyanins, the antioxidant that gives blueberries + eggplants their red, purple + blue hues. This sub-type of black tea has flavor profiles similar to black + green teas, but have their own distinct qualities.  Mostly grown in Kenya + some parts of China, this tea is rare, but rapidly growing in popularity.

H E R B A L/  T I S A N E

Blends of whole herbs, spices + flowers that do not use the tea leaf, but can be steeped similar to tea.  Best when blended by the hand of a master.  Also called “Tisanes”, they can be just as beneficial + soul soothing as tea, without the caffeine.

HOW TO TEA

Step 1:  DRY LEAVES

Visual appeal is everything.  Fine crafted Jadetiger tea leaves have been placed in tea sachets for ease of service.  Take a moment to observe the workmanship, skill + care that these leaves were given.  Tea masters look for good color, unbroken leaves, uniformity, + shape to name a few key qualities.

Step 2:  DRY LEAF AROMA

Pick up a sachet + capture the aroma of the dry leaves before brewing.  The nuances in tea range from earthy, smoky, + nutty, all the way to sweet, floral, fresh + fruity.  Some teas totally change character from dry leaf to steeping.  Breathe deep, close your eyes, + take in the deliciousness.

Step 3:  WATER

"The Mother of all Good Tea is Water."  Spring Water is preferred.  Other bottled water sources may not be as fresh or reliable.  Mineral water lends a metallic quality to tea.  Tap water is equivalent to tea sin.

It is advisable to not re-boil water; it will take on a flat character due to loss of oxygen from the first boiling.

A Glass or Ceramic boiling vessel is preferable, as metal kettles tend to extract minerals + metals, whereas plastic pots accumulate calcium deposits in the boiling process – all of which can fog the water + lend a metallic taste.

Step 4:  BREW

Steeping instructions for each tea is unique, be sure to read guidelines for different leaves.  Water temperature + steeping time are tea-specific to bringing out the brightest qualities of each leaf.  A few seconds too short, or a few degrees too hot + the tea can lose its maximum taste potential. 

Step 5:  SERVE + OBSERVE

Conjure your inner-hostess + bring out your favorite tea set or mug.  The key to the enjoyment of tea is the ceremonial pouring + sharing with others.  Using your best teacups + teapots are instrumental in creating the most memorable tea moments.

After pouring, take in the aroma of the steeped leaves.  {Be sure not to get scorched by the steam.}  Once complete, take a peek at the steeped leaves.  Show your guests how the leaves unfurl + change.

Observe the color + clarity of the tea liquor.  It varies for each tea, + for each steeping.

Step 6:  LET THE CONVERSATION BEGIN

Share the tea love with others.  Take the time to savor the cuppa + good company.  If you are taking tea solo, relax your mind + allow space for peace + quiet.

Step 7:  REPEAT

TO ADD OR...?

Additions to tea are cultural + vary from region to region.  {I enjoy my tea without adding.}  There are social norms + rules depending on where you are on the globe…

M I L K

Robust teas stand up well to milk.  Adding milk before the hot water tempers the teacup, but could hinder steeping temperature of the leaves.  Adding milk after the hot water allows the drinker to control how much milk is needed, but may cause the milk to heat unevenly.  Milk is not for more delicate, nuanced teas like white tea, Darjeelings, + some green teas.  Scientists have found that adding milk can delete some of the health benefits of tea.

L E M O N

Commonly added to iced teas and green teas, food scientists have found that adding lemon to green tea boosts the health benefits + detoxification process.

H O N E Y

Nature’s sweetener is antibacterial, antioxidant, antiviral… however be sure to let the tea cool so as to not destroy the molecular structure of honey.

S U G A R

Tea was initially consumed as a medicinal + had a bitter taste.  Sugar was an expensive luxury that made tea pleasantly consumable.  This practice has become universal + tea with sugar in the western world is a norm.  When trying to incorporate tea as a healthy diet + lifestyle, be sure to keep an eye on the calories + artificial sweeteners added to your cup.

RULES ARE MEANT TO BE...

Tea anarchy? YASSSS!  Tea is about taking a moment for yourself or with others, + we do it so rarely nowadays that my inner-hedonist tries to make every cup my best cup.  I LOOOOVE adding: fresh mint or basil from the organic garden box, a sprig of rosemary,  a lychee nut, fresh berries, a stalk of lemongrass, broken pieces of cinnamon, a slice of lime or a zest of orange. Be free + do what pleases your palette + soul.  What will you add??